Thursday, April 20, 2017

Dark, but oh so watchable

Of all the dark, nuanced British crime dramas, I think Luther is one of the best. So, today as part of this “I Like It” blog, I am recommending that on the next rainy weekend you hunker yourself down and watch all four seasons. I watched them on Netflix, but I think there might be other options (iTunes?) depending on where you live.
Luther has all of the attributes which make a good series—a flawed handsome character, a multitude of difficult to solve, almost “personal” crimes, weird and compelling mysteries, and an overarching theme which will make you come back for more. John Luther is the handsome, flawed character. He loves his wife, Zoe—but she’s leaving him, and yes, that is mostly his fault.  And as much as the “established” police force would like to let him go, his talent and instincts for crime solving are much needed.

In the very first episode we meet Alice Morgan, a young sociopath who Luther (and everyone else) believes murdered her parents. He can’t prove it. No one can. And throughout the entire four seasons, she and John develop this most strange and convoluted psychological relationship. That over-arching story line weaves its threads through every episode in the four seasons.

Some of these British crime dramas are so complex and nuanced that a second watching is almost required. I have watched the entire series twice, and the second time around picked up things I had missed in the first go round. Sets are brutal and noir. The stories are brutal and noir, the photography amazing.


Episodes include serial killers with strange fetishes, art museums, and even the murders of people close to him.

If you read this blog you know that I am a lover of first lines. It’s hard to do that in a TV series, so instead I offer you the music of the opening credits. The opening song 'Paradise Circus' by Massive Attack is haunting in its bleakness. Click here for a listen

I think it's because I love music, that I notice things like songs within television shows and movies. I've been known to scramble for a piece of paper when I hear a particularly compelling song that I wish to purchase on iTunes. I have actually filled my iTunes library with songs I have heard on Longmire, Luther, and many of the other dramas I have watched. 


And because I pay attention, I noticed that Massive Attack also do the opening song for the TV show, House. Here's a link to Massive Attack's Teardrop which is used there.  

Next time: It’s back to books this time with a part memoir, part self-help book by Margaret Trudeau entitled The Time of Your Life.




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